Ginger Apple Crumble

Hello, hello!

ginger apple crumbleHappy Friday, friends. How was your week? Snow is in the forecast for the weekend, and while I have to reserve time to pack and prep for the start of the semester (daily calls unfortunately don’t send themselves), I know I’ll also be baking up a storm with these last few days I have at home. If your weekend plans look similar, let me suggest a new recipe favorite: Ginger Apple Crumble, from Deb Perelman’s terrific cookbook Smitten Kitchen Every Day. Crumble goes by many names, but any combination of fruit with a topping of butter, sugar, and flour is a guaranteed crowd-pleaser, especially as the temperatures fall, meals linger on, and the call to bake and savor a warm dessert is hard to resist.

In fact, you could consider this a cozy winter afternoon in a dish. The flavor profile is certainly reminiscent of one, pairing a heavy but delightful dose of ginger with tart, cinnamon-dusted apples. You could make it for the spices alone, but part of a crumble’s appeal too, I think, is the simple comfort in putting it together: the peeling apples and zesting lemons and sprinkling dough. Needless to say, a recipe this rewarding begs to be tested.

That in mind, before you start, a small kitchen note: I like crumbles served warm right from the oven—you could say I’m a touch impatient—but my family has found this just as tasty stored in the fridge and warmed again when the craving strikes. Not that it lasts long in our kitchen—nor, do I imagine, will it in yours!

Ginger Apple Crumble Loosely adapted from Smitten Kitchen Every Day by Deb Perelman

ingredients for the apple filling

  • 3 large, tart baking apples (I used Granny Smith!)
  • Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • A pinch of ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • A pinch of salt

ingredients for the topping

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon candied ginger

to make

  1. Heat the oven to 375°F. Grease a 9-by-13 inch baking dish.
  2. Peel, halve, and core the apples. Cut pieces into one-inch wedges, and arrange in a single layer in prepared baking dish.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the lemon zest and juice, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, vanilla, sugar, and salt. Pour over apples and mix to coat them. Set aside.
  4. Melt the butter in a large bowl. Stir in the sugars, salt, baking powder, and ginger.
  5. Slowly mix in the flour and candied ginger. Clumps should naturally form with the addition of the flour, but if not, add a tablespoon of flour and continue to mix.
  6. Sprinkle the crumble on top of the apples.
  7. Bake crumble for 40-45 minutes. Crumble should be lightly browned.
  8. Let cool for ten minutes, and then enjoy!

Have the most wonderful weekend!
B

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Nineteen Anticipated Releases for 2019

Hello!

Happy Tuesday! How is your week going? Restful and well, I hope.

I’m popping in today to share a post I look forward to yearly: my most anticipated book releases! Drafting the list always feels a bit like Christmas, so giddy am I over the many terrific titles hitting shelves (I’m an easy bookworm to please).

A long post awaits, so I’ll make only a few brief notes. I’ve added to my draft of this post in spurts, so I apologize in advance if any of the release dates below have since shifted -the publishing world moves fast! True to the Top Ten Tuesday prompt, I’ve listed only books that come out in the first half of the year, so there’s nothing here released after June (I’m looking at you, The Map From Here to There). And finally, if you have a list of your own you’d like to link up, you can read about Top Ten Tuesday and do so here.

Here’s to a year of good books and much reading. What 2019 releases can’t you wait to read?

Famous in a Small Town by Emma MillsTo start, I’m counting down the days until Famous in a Small Town, the latest from Emma Mills, arrives in my mailbox (thankfully, there’s only a week to go!). I’ll take cute small-town contemporaries any day, and this one – with promises of tight-knit friendships and humorous revenge plots – sounds like an utter delight. I can’t wait. [Release Date: January 15]

StepsisterAuthor Jennifer Donnelly is known more for her gripping historical fiction than her fantasy retellings, but that just makes me even more excited to read Stepsister, her newest novel, once it hits shelves. Pitched as a “startling, fiercely feminist re-imagining of Cinderella,” the story is told through the eyes of one of Ella’s stepsisters. I’m already hooked. [Release Date: May 28]

Dig by A.S. KingThat I haven’t yet read anything by A.S. King is a fact I hope to remedy in 2019, an easy task with the release of her novel Dig in March. The summary is vague, but complicated family histories, surrealist narratives, and themes of legacy and power sound right up my alley – and, frankly, all more relevant than ever. [Release Date: March 26]

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My Top Nine Books of 2018

Hi friends!

Happy 2019! A new year – how exciting. Are you soaking in vacation still, or are you back at school/work? After a lovely last few days with my family (our winter break adventures included all good things: a viewing of the whimsical Mary Poppins Returns, a matinee of the brilliant Barber Shop Chronicles, and a stop to my favorite place on the Cape), I’m taking my day at home to tend to my to-do list – and, hopefully, to wrap up a novel or two!

In the meantime, I’m a bit late to the party, but I wanted to share my favorite books of 2018. It was a slow reading year for me – school and theatre took first priority – but I’m grateful that I was able to find so many favorites in what I did read. From adventurous series finales to quieter contemporary novels, find my top nine listed in alphabetical order below. What did you enjoy reading in 2018? (My TBR list is ready for your suggestions!).

And though, it’s Wednesday, I’m linking up with Top Ten Tuesday hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. Read more about the weekly series and add your own list HERE :-)

Being Fishkill by Ruth LehrerFirst on my list is Ruth Lehrer’s excellent, heartfelt debut, Being Fishkill, a YA novel that follows the friendship between thirteen-year-old Fishkill, her classmate Duck-Duck, and Duck-Duck’s mom, Molly. I’ve read it twice now – once when I grabbed it from my library and again for my Adolescent Literature class – and both times was I left moved by the resilience in Lehrer’s characters and the emotional punch of her poetic writing. One to read this year, for sure – especially if you’re looking for younger protagonists or representation of lower-class families.

Blink and You Die by Lauren ChildFew series have gripped and kept my interest like the Ruby Redfort books from Lauren Child; six books in, and I’ve learned to set aside an entire afternoon for reading each new installment. The last book had its US release in May, and it was certainly worth the wait. Ruby’s action-packed, puzzle-filled escapades end with the perfect blend of suspense, humor, and sass, and Child demonstrates an acute sense of pacing over the book’s 500+ pages. Fan I am, I’m biased, but I don’t think there’s a better set of mysteries for the middle-grade audience.

Breakout by Kate MessnerI’ve already raved about Kate Messner’s Breakout, but it’s for good reason: the epistolary novel is all at once tender, pressing, and thought-provoking in its discussions of race, class, and privilege. With such broad topics, it’d be easy to lose sight of the book’s young audience, but Messner doesn’t speak over her middle-grade readers; she instead crafts a narrative that is accessible as it is engaging. I wrote over the summer that it that blew me away, and the sentiment stands. Be prepared for me to recommend it time and time again over the months to come.

Everything Must Go by Jenny Fran DavisIf you haven’t yet read Everything Must Go, you’re missing out on one of the very best novels in feminist YA. Through its witty coming-of-age narrative, debut author Jenny Fran Davis establishes a distinctive voice (main character Flora is a memorable one!) and successfully tackles an ambitious plot that is as funny as it is thoughtful. Fans of Rookie, Lady Bird, and Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie will find it an utter delight, but I also plan to hand it to everyone I know in the coming year – and needless to say, I’m excited to see what Davis writes next.

Sadie by Courtney SummersSadie seemed to be everywhere this fall, but it’s hype that’s well-deserved. Courtney Summers has established herself as a staple of contemporary YA, and Sadie follows in her tradition of harrowing yet empowering narratives (leave it to Summers to strike that delicate balance). I finished it both on the edge of my seat from the quiet suspense and full of heartbroken anger that Sadie’s story mirrors the reality of so many. If you too choose to grab it, opt for the audiobook or listen to the podcast for a fully immersive reading experience. It’s worth it.

The Science of Breakable Things by Tae KellerIt’s not often that I cry while reading, but The Science of Breakable Things, the middle-grade debut of author Tae Keller, had me pulling out tissues left and right. Main character Natalie’s mission to help her mom is a heartwarming one, and Keller approaches mental illness with a care and nuance I wish were universal across children’s literature. One reviewer writes that it’s a novel that feels “so very human,” and I couldn’t agree more: characters aren’t perfect, but they aren’t called to be. All I can ask now is: next Tae Keller book soon, please?

The Strange Fascinations of Noah Hypnotik by David ArnoldSchool has kept me so out-of-the-loop of all things bookish that I’m not sure if The Strange Fascinations of Noah Hypnotik, David Arnold’s newest novel, flew under the radar or not. Nevertheless, I’ll say it here: it’s one of the best, if quirkiest, books I’ve read in a long time. Arnold’s storytelling risks (hypnosis! altered realities!) pay off, and Noah’s wry observations make him a narrator to remember. I’m encouraging anyone and everyone to check it out, if not for the numerous nods to pop culture, then for writing that sings and characters that stick.

Summer of Salt by Katrina LenoI wasn’t surprised that I fell in love with Summer of Salt, as I’ve yet to find a book of Katrina Leno’s that I haven’t adored. Nevertheless, so much stands out about her latest novel, a spell-binding tale about sisters on a small island: its beautiful atmospheric quality, its fierce storyline of lineage, sisterhood, and power, and its ability to be timely and timeless. It is, to take a cue from the notes I made just after reading, “everything I wanted and more.” Catch me recommending it endlessly now and reading it again in the summertime.

Wild Blue Wonder by Carlie SorosiakFinally, Wild Blue Wonder was one of my last reads of the summer. It’s also one of the few books this year that I devoured in a single day, hooked on the narration and growth of protagonist Quinn. Author Carlie Sorosiak has a knack for writing realistic characters and relatable family dynamics, and her immersive setting had me dreaming of the magic in summer afternoons and winter mornings. Fans of contemporary fiction would do well to grab a copy – I myself already plan to purchase it for my own bookshelf.

Have a wonderful Wednesday! xx