Jane: A Book Review

Hello!

Jane

Jane by April Lindner

Summary: After the death of her parents, nineteen year old Jane Moore is forced to drop out of an esteemed East Coast college due to the cost. Desperate for money and a job, Jane takes a position as a nanny at Thornfield Park, home to the legendary rock star Nico Rathburn. About to make a comeback, Nico is too busy with prep for his tour to deal with his daughter, Maddy. Jane is happy to help out and fits right in with the rest of the housekeeping staff. After a few weeks at Thornfield, Jane finally meets her employer. Nico seems very interested with Jane, wanting to know more about her personal life than how the job is. As time goes on, Nico and Jane come to love each other, despite the secrets they are keeping. There’s no doubt that the two have a romantic connection, but a rock star would never marry his daughter’s nanny, right?

My Thoughts: I liked Jane Erye enough that I wanted to read this popular adaption of it. My mom read it first, and she recommended it, so into the big pile of books it went :) I loved this version, and I might add that I liked it a *teensy* bit more than the original. The idea of Mr. Rochester being a rock star is awesome, and the rest of the story just fit around that concept. In this version, Jane was still plain, smart, and she spoke her mind. Her moods and emotions weren’t quite as evident, but there was enough personality that she was still a developed character. I missed the part of her as a child and young teen with her ever-so active imagination. I wish April Linder included that part, but the flashbacks were good enough. Nico was cool. Sure, he made plenty of stupid mistakes, but those lovey-dovey scenes made me want to hug him :) I especially loved when he was with Maddy. I know it didn’t sound like he spent a lot of time with her, but he DID care. He even said that he wanted to be a better dad! I liked the Nico and Jane relationship. You could clearly tell that they loved each other, and would do anything to be together. Jane totally wanted to stay with Nico after that failed wedding, but she was confused. Finding out that your fiancé is hiding his wife in an attic because she is a bit crazy on your wedding day would do that to a girl. I could actually tolerate River in this one. {Couldn’t stand Mr. St. John last time} He was still a bit too work focused, but the author did a terrific job translating the character into modern times. Diana and Mary were two goofballs as always, but they were my favorites. I hope that Jane and the sisters met up again! Maddy was a cutie-patootie and I felt bad that she had to grow up in such a dysfunctional household. She didn’t understand half of what was going on! Kitty and Yvonne were supportive, and I think that they would be very good friends for Jane if she ever saw them again. I thought April Linder made the classic story a wonderful modern novel. If people read this, and then read Jane Erye, even better! I think what reviewers/critics need to stop doing is comparing the entire story as a whole to Jane Erye. Yes, it’s a retelling, but, no, not everything is going to be exactly the same. The characters and plot are going to differ from the original.

Pros: The characters were well-developed and the pace of the story was good.

Cons: I don’t know. Some things could have been added, but nothing too bad.

Heads Up: Language and loooooove :)

Overall: I give it 4 1/2 stars {**** 1/2} and I recommend it for ages 14 and up. {Preferably having read Jane Erye first, but totally not required.}

To read my review of Jane Erye, click here.

Bella :)

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